Borderland Voices a charity promoting Health and Well-being through the Arts

 

TESTIMONIALS

Art in a poly tunnel"It's an ignition, it's a spark…What happens is when they've ignited me a little bit here I go home & I stay on that creation. If you are creating things you don't get depressed."

"Writing is very much involved in my life for the rest of the week. It gives me something else rather than sitting and dwelling, getting depressed."

"I can only see it getting better, they introduce new things all the time and that provides excitement, something to look forward to."

"The one thing I can say about art, as opposed to other things, it starts this mystical, magical quality, or it seems like it has, it draws you into it, it absorbs you like nothing else. It does me anyway."

"If you're creating things you don't get depressed. You can't. You've only got so many things in your head, creating lifts that mood. You just keep your head focused on making things, that's the way out of depression."

"I do it at home as well and I've got something to do to keep my mind off one thing and another...[otherwise] I'd be sitting thinking and getting more & more depressed. yourself…You get the benefits of being with people similar to yourself…No pressure to fit in"

"There are opportunities to share, two way, to help each other...So it feels like a safe group… It's belonging as well. This is our group…and I feel safe coming here. It's like you can be in a community and catch a cold. You can come in here and catch a bit of life. You actually catch life."

"It makes me realise I'm not on my own, I don't feel so isolated, especially with the stigma…Feeling lonely and unwanted, it's helped not to eliminate it but keeps it in check… Otherwise I'm just sitting on my own at home, you see. And what nicer than to be with people that got the same interests as well."

"I still have my safety zones but it's taught me a lot that I can interact with people… I've had friends & family saying to me that they've seen the differences – I am responding to the world differently…it's taught me a lot that I can interact with people…I wouldn't have touched a course in the community, its still a barrier to me but I'm making the circle bigger so it's positive… it's making the safety zone bigger."

"I think it's just therapeutic to go and sort of do a painting and sort of express yourself that way rather than talking about your problems all day and getting more and more depressed which is what I think sometimes happens…you're just feeding it."

"If you've got lots of crap going on in your head and you're thinking 'god I can't cope with this', the voices are strong or something or you just can't cope. It's just good to get it out on paper, … the voices…its a way of saying 'I'm not going to cope with you today'…It helps you get shit out of your head when you feel you can't cope. … Even if you chuck it away afterwards you know at least you've got it out on a piece of paper and you can look at it and say 'well that's that piece of shit!' And then you've got it all sort of all on a piece of paper and you can sort it all out in your head and get it in some sort of order. You can sort it all out in your head seeing it on paper just makes sense of it."

"Because you're expressing, you're putting bad memories into good use, if you know what I mean, bad feelings and bad memories into a positive use instead of a negative. Instead of getting really depressed or whatever, whatever illness you've got, it's going into something positive rather than…, so that helps as well."

"Writing became a focus because of a lot of stuff I was struggling with, it became a big expression for me of how to try and come to terms with what I was feeling …you've got the knock-on effect then because I was feeling that I could be myself, I could write myself then I could lead myself and then you get to understand yourself a bit more."

"They're a way of expressing me, who I am, just leaving my paw print on the world, if you like…It's singing, writing and art, crafts and painting, things like I can put my own individual personal unique stamp on…it's helping me change as a person to know"

"I think everyone seems to understand what you're going through so if you're having a particular bad day and you've got flash backs and you've got all the crap going on you can sort of think 'well I'll put that on to paper' and people don't sort of say 'oh god what's that?'. You know they'll sort of say 'oh that's a really weird image' or 'that looks really powerful' or something and you can sort of share things with people… You can be yourself…You get the benefits of being with people similar to yourself…No pressure to fit in "

"There are opportunities to share, two way, to help each other...So it feels like a safe group… It's belonging as well. This is our group…and I feel safe coming here. It's like you can be in a community and catch a cold. You can come in here and catch a bit of life. You actually catch life."

"It makes me realise I'm not on my own, I don't feel so isolated, especially with the stigma…Feeling lonely and unwanted, it's helped not to eliminate it but keeps it in check… Otherwise I'm just sitting on my own at home, you see. And what nicer than to be with people that got the same interests as well."

"I still have my safety zones but it's taught me a lot that I can interact with people… I've had friends & family saying to me that they've seen the differences – I am responding to the world differently…it's taught me a lot that I can interact with people…I wouldn't have touched a course in the community, its still a barrier to me but I'm making the circle bigger so it's positive… it's making the safety zone bigger."

"I think it's just therapeutic to go and sort of do a painting and sort of express yourself that way rather than talking about your problems all day and getting more and more depressed which is what I think sometimes happens…you're just feeding it."

"They're a way of expressin myself...I'm free from all that, I'm being myself, that's what I'm here for, to be me … I'm doing it for myself, not because of what it's going to get me in the world's terms …It's protecting me...from insanity. "

"They're always, always putting on new things and new classes and in that way, yeah, I'm up for anything that will feed my imagination and my creativity and help me to feel that life's fun."

"It gives me a break from my routine of work and worrying about paying bills, which can be very stressful especially when you suffer with anxiety and depression. This, I switch myself off and it's a real treat…it does help, it's wonderful."

"People see me differently – a flamboyant character, and I think that was a compliment…There's parts of me I didn't know were there but other people are noticing it."

"It's not just something that's someone with mental health problems has produced it's something that an artist has produced and it just so happens that they've got mental problems as well."

"It gave me confidence to tell people that I am a writer, I am an artist. Before I used to hide anything I did, just do it in secret because I used to think well, people think I'm mad. Who am I? I'm just an ordinary, you know what I mean? Because I'd had success and that support, I became more confident, say to people, well, I don't really want to go to work, I've got to because I've got to pay the bills, but I'm really an artist and I'm a writer."

"It's given me more of a belief in myself that I can do things and you know, I'm not going to just sit back and be on benefits for the rest of my life. I do actually want to do something and sort of pay my own way and get a job. I think Borderland's helped me because it's just given me the confidence and the sort of pointers you know to sort of start doing things for myself. ."

 

 

HEADLINES

Great News: BV is one of Co-op Local Community Fund’s chosen causes, 9 April - 7 October 2017. They give 1% of member spend (Co-op branded products) to local causes. So please join, spend & choose us.

We learned with sadness that Tony Boston’s father, Jim died before Christmas. His mother Margaret is now in a nursing home in Blythe Bridge.

Joan Jones’s family kindly divided donations in her memory between a hospice & BV. We received £210 which will augment current Awards for All funding, as it doesn’t cover all writing costs.

Jim & Margaret Boston, Tony’s parents, dropped by last month. They made a most generous £300 donation in Tony’s memory to support the art group in 2017

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The Jun 2017 newsletter has been added on the newsletter page (8/5/2017)

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FORTHCOMING EVENTS 2017

The Lord Lieutenant of Staffordshire or his deputy will present the Queen's Award later in the year & we’ll send out invitations when a date has been agreed.